WHAT WOULD THE CORGIS DO?

Thoughts on software remodeling and legacy code.
  • Don't Take the Bait
    JAN 19, 2017 Written by Jocelyne Morin-Nurse

    Even though Conway's Law originated in the software world, it's easy to extrapolate the idea to pretty much anything an organization produces, including content. I would even say that it’s not only the communication structures that permeate the content, but also the organization’s values and culture.

  • GIS Basics
    JAN 17, 2017 Written by David Grieser

    Do you use a GPS navigator on road trips? Or a GPS watch to track your run or bike ride? Then, you’ve been exposed to GIS. GIS stands for Geographic Information System. Even if you haven’t used the two items I mentioned, I’m confident you’ve experienced it, as most everyone has used GIS in one form or another. The most common usage is the maps application on a smartphone.

  • The Postman Always Helps Twice
    JAN 10, 2017 Written by Nickie McCabe

    In my role as Director of Operations at Corgibytes, one of my responsibilities is automating and optimizing our day-to-day tasks and workflow. As a result, one of the common patterns of my work is gathering, manipulating, and presenting data of various sorts. Thankfully, much of the data I’m gathering is accessible via API, which means I get to use one of my favorite technical tools: Postman.

  • A Brief History of Enterprise Software - Part 2, Cloud City and Open Source Makin' It Rain
    JAN 5, 2017 Written by Brian Bassett

    A few months ago, I wrote about how a small group of engineers with a noble idea created open source software and changed the world. The idea proved the collective intelligence model for software development and allowed for an explosion of software products. In this post, we will explore how those early gains accelerated quickly through cloud computing and the birth of Software as a Service (SaaS)

  • Starting a Journey with Clojure and ClojureScript
    JAN 3, 2017 Written by Kamil Ogórek

    If you've never tried functional programming development, I assure you that this is one of the best time investments you can make. You will not only learn a new programming language, but also a completely new way of thinking. A completely different paradigm.

  • White Space as an Active Element: Learning to Say No
    DEC 22, 2016 Written by Andrea Goulet

    If you sent me an email today, you’d get an autoresponder that starts with a quote from Jan Tschichold. What better quote to feature during my own “White Space” time in December and January, during which I’ve purposely limited my meeting schedule and am only checking email once a day.

  • Technical Interviews Are Not Spec Work
    DEC 20, 2016 Written by M. Scott Ford

    We're interviewing people to join the Corgibytes team. When I mention this to others, I hear a wide range of opinions on what exactly those technical interviews should look like. Over the years, I've experienced the gamut myself. Some were intensive. Some thought-provoking. Some... bizarre.

  • I Hate Testing Angular Applications
    DEC 13, 2016 Written by Catalina De la cuesta

    First, a confession: I recently wrote a blog post about unit testing an Angular application. Well, as it turns out, what I was in fact doing was trying to convince everybody of the joys of Angular testing. Including myself.

  • Technical Blogging as Storytelling
    DEC 8, 2016 Written by Jocelyne Morin-Nurse

    Do you remember the scene in Silver Linings Playbook when our main character portrayed by Bradley Cooper, Pat Solitano Jr, finishes reading his Hemingway novel (if you haven’t, caution, strong language)? I’ve done that. In my mind only, sure. But I have uttered swear words after finishing books, movies, TV series, and even blog posts.

  • On Getting Old(er) in Tech
    DEC 6, 2016 Written by Don Denoncourt

    After years of scoffing at talk of prejudice in the information technology field -- as a white male with good hair --, I'm starting to call prejudice against my being old(er). It’s true: age discrimination is a real thing.