WHAT WOULD THE CORGIS DO?

Thoughts on software remodeling and legacy code.
  • Boosting Confidence in Your Code
    NOV 29, 2016 Written by David Grieser

    I was looking for inspiration for my next blog topic and read through some of my old posts. I came across one called “Confidence From Your Code” that originally appeared on Femgineer in 2014. I thought: “Perfect! It's been a few years since I wrote that, I now work with Corgibytes and have even more legacy code experience, I'll update my thoughts.”

  • Corgis' First Computers
    NOV 24, 2016 Written by Jocelyne Morin-Nurse

    Working on a remote team, we need to be extra creative to find ways to socialize, get to know each other better and even share a few laughs. Those natural moments like a quick hello-how-are-you in the hallway just don't happen. That's why we've enlisted the help of our very own custom bot member, Ein.

  • Free Class on Continuous Integration, Continuous Delivery, and DevOps!
    NOV 22, 2016 Written by Jocelyne Morin-Nurse

    Our beloved Chief Code Whisperer, M. Scott Ford, was invited – again – to be a guest lecturer at the Harvard Extension School. Watch this FREE class on continuous integration, continuous delivery, and DevOps from our own “Bob Vila of the Internet” (and special thanks to Trainer and Coach Richard Kasperowski, Teaching Assistant Wendy Wong, the Harvard Extension School, and the amazing students in the Agile Software Development class).

  • The Importance of Empathy
    NOV 15, 2016 Written by Nickie McCabe

    Over the past year, we’ve written a lot about empathy on this blog. We’ve discussed empathy-driven development, the empathy spectrum, and the fact that empathy is a skill. And like any skill, it can be learned and takes practice to build. But perhaps one of the most important posts was actually an update to an existing one.

  • A Brief History of Enterprise Software - Part 1, Making the World a Better Place
    NOV 10, 2016 Written by Brian Bassett

    As a person who has worked in enterprise software and technology for almost 20 years, I always marvel at how different this industry looks from twenty, ten, or even just five years ago. Over the last two years, the landscape has shifted for classic enterprise vendors like IBM, Oracle and Microsoft in dramatic ways, but the massive tectonic shifts we now see have only been due to the incremental changes deep below the surface for decades.

  • Highlights of This Year's EuroClojure and ReactiveConf
    NOV 8, 2016 Written by Kamil Ogórek

    If you love old architecture and castles, you'll fall for Bratislava. Easily one of the most beautiful places you can visit in Europe, this Slovakian capital is small enough that you can drive/walk quickly to most places, but big enough to fill your schedule for a few days. It may surprise some to find out that, when it comes to software development, the area is very quickly becoming one of the European tech hubs. Last month, Bratislava hosted two big conferences in one week.

  • Throwaway Code
    NOV 1, 2016 Written by M. Scott Ford

    Over the years, I've heard a lot of different attitudes regarding code that’s going to be thrown away. Let me be clear here. I’m not talking about code that we think might get thrown away. I’m talking about code that we know will get thrown away.

  • I'm in the Band
    OCT 27, 2016 Written by Jocelyne Morin-Nurse

    Last Friday, I caught a friend’s band at a local pub. I know how it sounds. “A friend’s band. That’s cute.” Except it’s not like that. This friend is an exceptional guitarist. When he plays, it’s like watching Joe Satriani, Jimmy Hendrix, Slash. His instrument becomes an expression of his soul.

  • Testing an Angular Application
    OCT 25, 2016 Written by Catalina De la cuesta

    I recently started writing tests for an Angular application, so I had to go through the entire process of researching the tools, installing and setting up the libraries, writing the tests and learning the tricks. Here's what I discovered.

  • Git Blame Isn't for Incrimination
    OCT 18, 2016 Written by David Grieser

    When building a feature or fixing a bug, you will be reading the code that exists. One thing I do often is ask, “Why was this done this way?” Programming is not a binary profession. Fuzzy logic would be a better way to explain how problems get solved. Just as programmers' experiences vary, you can find many solutions to get from 0 to 1. So, when I want to answer my initial question, I leverage git blame.