WHAT WOULD THE CORGIS DO?

Thoughts on software remodeling and legacy code.
  • Interactive Notebooks - Part 2: Getting Advanced with nteract
    JUN 13, 2017 Written by M. Scott Ford

    As mentioned in my introductory post on the topic, while doing research for another article, I dug into nteract pretty deeply. It's how I like to learn about new things. nteract ships with the ability to run JavaScript code in notebooks, and I was wondering if it had the ability to do more than that. What I discovered revealed an entirely new level of awesome for using interactive notebooks.

  • Open Source Sustainability
    MAY 29, 2017 Written by M. Scott Ford

    Open source sustainability has been on our minds lately. We think that we could help a lot, but we're not exactly sure what that should look like.

  • Stop Treating Digital Weapons Like Biological Weapons
    MAY 15, 2017 Written by M. Scott Ford

    Our Chief Code Whisperer, M. Scott Ford, shares his thoughts about the WannaCry/WannaCrypt malware and reinforces a call for a Digital Geneva Convention.

  • Bash Tips - Tip 1
    MAY 2, 2017 Written by David Grieser

    Recently, I was pairing with a developer on a client's team. He was stuck and couldn't figure out how to fix the problem. I had a look and guided him through a series of bash and other shell commands until we found the solution. After thanking me -- he had been at it for hours -- he asked me 'How do you know all of this?'

  • npm Scripts: Tips Everyone Should Know
    APR 18, 2017 Written by Kamil Ogórek

    npm is not only the package manager for JavaScript, it's also used to set up tooling around your codebase. Linters, transpilers, testing, and servers. Everything can be configured and run using the very same thing. Basic usage is really simple, too.

  • Hello, TDD!
    APR 11, 2017 Written by Tiffany Gill

    Have you ever had one of those “down-the-rabbit-hole” experiences, in which one idea sends you careening through a wormhole of thought? Such a journey often yields unexpected results, yet the “mind map” of your travels can actually be even more surprising. Well, it was one such “Eureka!” moment that convinced me of the parallels between the classic Hello, World! program and Test-Driven Development (TDD).

  • Interactive Notebooks - Part 1: Getting Started with nteract
    APR 4, 2017 Written by M. Scott Ford

    In this two-part post, I explain what are interactive notebooks, why we'd want to use them, and how to get started with the nteract desktop program.

  • Take Charge of Your Career Path
    MAR 30, 2017 Written by Jocelyne Morin-Nurse

    A few years ago, in a screenwriting class, our instructor asked us the following question: “How do you prepare yourself to write? What things do you do to create an environment that’s conducive to writing?” This was the third quarter with my fellow students – first class with this instructor – and I was comfortable speaking my mind. My answer went something like this: “I don’t have time for that. I only have one hour at lunch to write. So I turn on my laptop and I write.”

  • Unlocking the Beauty of Patterns in Binary Data
    MAR 28, 2017 Written by Catalina De la cuesta

    Software engineers usually don’t deal with binary data directly. Most data is stored in well-known, open-format files and manipulated through libraries that know how to handle them. So bits and bytes are almost never in a developer’s mind. Apparently, they even scare people: all that random, unreadable mess not meant for human consumption...

  • Show up for Work and Don't Steal
    MAR 21, 2017 Written by Don Denoncourt

    While doing his undergraduate at Virginia Tech, my son Tyler worked at 100-Cents (or some such store of similar name). He went on to graduate with honors and become a CPA at one of the Big-5 accounting firms. Then, he got an MBA at Darden (one of the top MBA colleges in the country). And now, he is an investment banker that manages the sales and acquisition of companies valued over a billion dollars. So he’s doing OK. But, instead of telling him I’m proud of his accomplishments, I chide him saying: “I had hopes of you becoming a manager at 100-Cents.” Which is not necessarily a career that you spend $250,000 on education to achieve.